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Bryum capillare

Bryum capillare


This moss is at its most conspicuous in  late spring to summer when the abundant pear-shaped capsule appear.

At first, the capsules are green but later their colour changes to chestnut brown.

Bryum capillare
 
Bryum capillare
 

Bryum capillare

The capsules of Bryum capillare bend over and hang downwards from the red
setae.

The leaves of this moss are well worth viewing under the microscope when it is then possible to see the fascinating patterns of the cells.

The tips of the leaves extend into hair-like points

Bryum capillare

This picture of Bryum capillare is of a colony growing on the Waterloo Monument in St Leonards.

Among the new, bright green, capsules there are still a few empty brown ones from the previous years growth.

Later in the year, when the new capsules ripen, they will turn a chesnut-brown colour, the end caps will fall of and the spores within will be released.
Bryum capillare
 
Bryum capillare
 

Bryum capillare

Late in the autumn, the formerly green capsules have turned to chestnut brown. In dry weather, small "fingers" at the mouth of the capsules open and allow the spores to be released.

When the wind shakes the capsules, the spores are carried far and wide and if they find a suitable environment, they grow into new plants.

The mosses shown here are also from the Waterloo monument located in St Leonards.

Bryum capillare

Bryum capillare is only one of several mosses that live on walls. In this picture it can be seen living in company with tufts of Grimmia pulvinata and Tortula muralis.

This colony can be seen on the wall next to the Waterloo monument and Hermits and Termits in St Leonards.

Enjoy looking at and photographing these wonderful plants. Please don't remove any but instead leave them for the whole community to share.
Bryum capillare

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This project was funded by the RIAS Millennium Awards Scheme